Saturday, December 3, 2011

Review: Stuff: Compulsive Hoarding and the Meaning of Things by Randy O. Frost and Gail Steketee

Stuff: Compulsive Hoarding and the Meaning of ThingsStuff: Compulsive Hoarding and the Meaning of Things by Randy O. Frost
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

First, I have not seen a full episode of the A&E show "Hoarders," only clips and ads. So if you have seen the show, this book may or may not be what you expect. Unlike most reality TV shows, however, Frost and Steketee do not have to shape a hoarder's life for dramatic effect; they can let the facts speak for themselves. And the facts are engrossing.

The authors are psychologists who conduct research on hoarding, and in "Stuff" they present case studies, composite profiles, and historical instances of hoarders and the effects they and their possessions have had on family, friends, and society. There is the famous story of the Collyer brothers of New York, whose lives are notably the focus of E.L. Doctorow's latest novel, "Homer & Langley." The details of their lives seem to characterize many hoarders profiled elsewhere in the book: financial independence or being well-to-do, symptoms that point to OCD, intense attention to detail, rich inner lives and stories for their possessions, relatives who are themselves hoarders or collectors, limited social lives.

Frost and Steketee are careful to point out that hoarding is not a recent phenomenon in the U.S., as the show "Hoarders" might suggest, nor do hoarders fit within an easily definable personality profile. They can be as young as five years old and as beautiful as a runway model. Some hoarders require extreme interventions that involve social workers and cleaning crews while others, such as the woman whose home was lined with shopping bags of unworn clothing and accessories, can eventually control their hoarding with professional help.

The authors address the state of research on hoarding, its causes, and treatments, as they cover different aspects of hoarders' lives. They often note how very little research has been done on a particular topic, because it is difficult to conduct a study when, for instance, a participant takes close to two hours to answer a 15-minute questionnaire or write paragraphs to a multiple-choice question.

"Stuff" is aimed at a general audience, rather than an academic one, so Frost and Steketee present their case studies and profiles relatively free of awkward phrasing and unfamiliar jargon. This also means that they can share their own experiences and insights of working with and interviewing hoarders and hoarders' relatives. One notable example was one of their undergraduate research assistants who didn't realize her mother's problem had a name. During their interview, she would yell at her mom and throw accusations at her, despite everything she learned in class.

In spite of the current economic downturn, stuff is affordable, credit is still readily available, and one person's junk pile always holds the promise of unclaimed treasures. With "Stuff," Frost and Steketee present complicated, sometimes sympathetic, portraits of people living with a psychological problem that is all too often misunderstood. (4.5 stars)

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Tuesday, October 4, 2011

Review: 79 Short Essays on Design by Michael Bierut

79 Short Essays on Design
79 Short Essays on Design by Michael Bierut
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The majority of what's collected in this book are reviews, but they sometimes read like essays. Because of this, Bierut's writing refers to controversies and hot topics at the time and they occasionally show their flaws in the light of the passing years. Some are remembrances of influential designers, artists, photographers, and creative persons who have recently passed away and played some role in shaping Bierut's life. But the best work comes in the form of the more recognizable essays, that is, the writings that transcend time while capturing it. A shining example of Bierut's congruent power of writing as a designer can be seen in "On (Design) Bullshit." Bierut recounts one of the major confrontations between architect Richard Meier and artist Robert Irwin in the 1997 documentary, "Concert of Wills," which chronicles the construction of the Getty Center in Los Angeles. He finishes the piece with an example from his years working as a designer with Massimo Vignelli. What is evident in reading these 79 articles is that designers are influenced by any and everything, even falling off a treadmill at the gym.

Given that this is a book on design written by a notable designer (Bierut is a partner in renowned international design agency Pentagram), the content and how it is packaged are presented in a clever manner: each article is presented in a different typeface, most of which is connected to or referenced in the article. (See "I Hate ITC Garamond.")

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Sunday, October 2, 2011

Sunday, September 11, 2011

September 11, 2011


Sept. 11: 2001-2011


When they don’t want to defend the people they put them in uniforms and start defending the country.
— Samuli Paronen

There is no instance of a nation benefiting from prolonged warfare.
— Sun Tzu

In war the result is never final.
— Clause von Clausewitz

Am I still dreaming?

Two weeks ago, I told a friend/coworker that I sometimes fear going to sleep because during my slumber I may slip into a parallel world that is at once familiar yet fundamentally different from the day before. It would be no different than if I were living in a dream.

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

My review of "Chasing the Perfect: Thoughts on Modernist Design in Our Time"

Chasing the Perfect: Thoughts on Modernist Design in Our Time
Chasing the Perfect: Thoughts on Modernist Design in Our Time by Natalia Ilyin
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

A collection of personal essays centered on design, Ilyin voices the doubts some of us have when we see a chair, fork, or table in a catalogue that looks perfectly designed with its clean lines, brushed stainless steel surface, and its hefty price tag. We see these items for their promises of a better life after we slide our plastic cards through the checkout line and bring back the haul into our homes. But these promises can often be nothing more than hollow and imbalanced, despite appearances. Even when we choose imperfection, as Ilyin notes with great insight, it's for the "right" type of imperfection.

"What will happen to us as a culture when we have been completely conditioned only to choose between options, rather than to come up with solutions?" Ilyin asks. It's a question that goes beyond the world of design.

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Tuesday, June 14, 2011

My review of "The Poisoner's Handbook" by Deborah Blum

The Poisoner's Handbook
The Poisoner's Handbook by Deborah Blum
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Blum does a wonderful job of portraying the lives and work of Dr. Charles Norris, New York's first professional chief medical examiner, and Alexander Gettler, a tireless toxicologists and researcher. She shows how prevalent and easily available various poisons were in New York during the early 20th century. The descriptions of the havoc left behind by the different poisons, which frame each section of the book, are succinct with a touch of Blum's flair for the right detail without being gratuitous — an interesting balancing act to read. As we learn about each poison, Blum provides examples of actual crimes and accidental deaths related to them. Ironically, one of the more horrific times for alcohol-related deaths was Prohibition due to people imbibing industrial alcohol adulterated with government-sanctioned chemicals that were supposed to deter them. Despite what some may say and think of them today, the Food and Drug Administration was finally given expanded regulatory oversight over numerous manufactured products such as pesticides, makeup, and food and alcohol. Norris and Gettler's hard work, persistence, and rigorous research helped pave the way to a safer world.

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(It's scary how much Blum knows about how to poison a person ... which makes for a very funny "Author's Note.")

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Sunday, June 12, 2011

A brief review of "A Bride's Tale" by Kaoru Mori

A Bride's Story, Vol. 1
A Bride's Story, Vol. 1 by Kaoru Mori
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Sumptuous period detail with patient, unfurling storytelling. Mori has shown much improvement since "Emma" with this story of a 19th century Middle Eastern bride and her new family. Unlike other manga reprints, Yen Press has published this in a larger format (about the size of a regular paperback) that succeeds in showcasing Mori's fine art.

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Wednesday, May 25, 2011

My review of Jonathan Franzen's "Freedom"

Freedom
Freedom by Jonathan Franzen
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

What does it mean to be a person in the "land of the free" when each and every one of us are bound by the relationships we find ourselves in, regardless of whether or not we want to be in them? What does it mean to be "free" in a world that, despite or because of, our global connectedness to whatever abstract or concrete degree that we can see and feel it, doesn't allow us to be truly alone to experience utter freedom? Can we find some redemption and solace in knowing that just as we are free to make mistakes, we are equally free to correct them? These types of questions were popping in my mind as I read "Freedom." Franzen attempts to put into a novel a definitive account of not only one family's saga and but also the national generational sensibilities that seeped throughout the U.S. of the 2000s. He succeeds in weaving together the thoughts and actions of his characters with objective and acute observations about them in a way reminiscent of voice-overs in nature documentaries. Patty's early life in the beginning of "Freedom" was a slog to get through and it was jarring initially to read her memoirs in the third person, but it laid the foundation for her dealings with her family and friends later on. Reading the travails of the Berglunds in "Freedom" felt as messy, fascinating, and complicated as hearing the latest life news from a close friend or family member.

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In need of service

Life has been busy. This place needs a new coat and some freshness in it, which I will work on.


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Sunday, March 13, 2011

Sunday itinerary at the 2011 Tucson Festival of Books

Who is this rabbit?
I'll be tweeting for the Arizona Daily Wildcat @wildcatarts as SK. Here's my itinerary for second, and final, day of the 2011 Tucson Festival of Books with alternatives in place:

10 - 11 a.m.
Critics Table: The Power of the Restaurant Review
Culinary Stage - UA Mall
Bon Appetit magazine's EIC Barbara Fairchild, Tucson-based reviewer Rita Connelly and chef Janos Wilder all at once? I'm there.

Alternatives:
Building Comics from the Ground Up
Integrated Learning Center - Room 140
This is my first alternative if my first choice is full, which, given my experiences yesterday, is likely. Terry Moore was great to interview and Eric Esquivel is an engaging guy on, well, any topic.

Against the Odds: Women in Jeopardy
Student Union - Tucson Room
I caught Wendy Corsi Staub and Libby Fischer Hellmann at a panel about relationships in crime fiction and they were great to listen to, so this sounds like a good choice.

11 - 11:30 a.m.
Time for an early lunch, which proved to be a prudent choice yesterday.

11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Modern Heroes/Heroines in Science Fiction and Fantasy
Integrated Learning Center - Room 140

Alternatives:
Banned Again! Difficult Issues in Teen Novels
Join Lauren Myracle, the most frequently banned author in the country, to talk about her experiences with censorship and the importance of building bridges rather than taking oppositional stances when a book is challenged. Oh, and she promises not to be boring.
Education Building - Kiva Auditorium
I've never read any of Myracle's books since I am not her target reader nor am I a parent. I'm curious as to what has made her books so controversial.

Writing Science for Non-Scientists
Integrated Learning Center - Room 137
Meg Daley Olmert

The Graphic Novel: Is a Picture Really Worth 1,000 Words?
UA Mall Tent
Diana Gabaldon and Luis Alberto Urrea speaking about graphic novels? Might be interesting, especially since I reviewed the comic book adaptation of Gabaldon's first novel for the Arizona Daily Wildcat.

12:30 - 1 p.m.
Break!

1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
The Woman Who Ate Chinatown
Culinary Stage - UA Mall
I haven't read Shirley Fong-Torres' book, but it sounds like something I would do.

Alternatives:
Dry Run: Preventing the Next Urban Water Crisis
UA Bookstore
There are obvious reasons for my interest in this.

Crazy Desert Dudes: Surviving the Southwest
Koffler - Room 204
From what Mitch Tobin told me in an interview early this week, this is about how to incorporate your own desert experiences into your writing and everyone will be talking about their desert adventures.

Books into Movies: Adapting and Being Adapted
Modern Languages - Room 350

2 - 2:30
Wander around, take photos, avoid the E-Reader Experience tent

2:30 - 3:30
Appetite for America: How Fred Harvey Fed America
Culinary Stage - UA Mall
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Harvey_(entrepreneur)

Alternatives:
How I Killed Pluto
Mike Brown is an astronomer and the author of "How I Killed Pluto and Why It Had It Coming." He discovered Eris, the largest object found in the solar system in 150 years, and the object that led to the debate and eventual demotion of Pluto from a real planet to a dwarf planet. Mike was named one of Time's most influential people of 2006.
Arizona Daily Star Pavilion - UA Mall

Food Writing 101
Integrated Learning Center - Room 135

Physics of Magic
Integrated Learning Center - Room 140

3:30 - 4 p.m.
Break!

4 - 5 p.m.
Future of Publishing
UA Bookstore

Alternatives:
Writing and Publishing Personal Essays
Integrated Learning Center - Room 119

Science Fiction vs. Fantasy vs. Horror: The Ultimate Showdown
Integrated Learning Center - Room 140
The fact that Arizona Public Media's Mark McLemore is moderating this would be worth a visit.

The Locavore Kitchen
Culinary Stage - UA Mall

University of Arizona Asian Music Club, Purple Bamboo Ensemble
Bear Down Entertainment Stage
I didn't know the UA had such a music club. Might be worth catching.

See you there!

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Friday, March 11, 2011

Going to the 2011 Tucson Festival of Books: Saturday edition

 
Book Fair , originally uploaded by arizonadailywildcat.
This will be my second year attending the festival, and it looks to be a good lineup. I'll be posting updates and observations about the event via the Arizona Daily Wildcat's Twitter account for the arts desk, @wildcatarts, and through my own account, @GrayBackMatter, with #TFOB in my tweets. I will also have the day's recap at either DailyWildcat.com or the Daily Wildcat arts blog, On the Beat.

You can find more information about the two-day event in my Daily Wildcat preview article and at the official website. The organizers have also created apps for iPhone and Android users for the first time this year, which contains information about the festival. The Android version still has some bugs in it, but it's not a bad way to figure who and what are where.

Here's my Saturday itinerary for the festival with alternatives in place in case something is canceled or I get bored:

10 - 11 a.m.
Bringing Meaning out of Meaninglessness: How Literature Can Respond to the January 8th Shootings
Chemistry - Room 111

Alternatives:
Are You Smarter Than a Cheese Grater? Word Games with Merl Reagle
Arizona Daily Star Pavilion - UA Mall

Digging Holes and Turning Cards: Creating Characters that Become Books with Louis Sachar
Education Building - Kiva Auditorium

11 - 11:30 a.m.
Small lunch break + Chinese dance

11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Spin, Ink: Exposing Corporate Malfeasance
Koffler - Room 204

Alternatives:
Hot Times: Can Nature Survive Us?
Student Union - Gallagher Theater

Bon Appétit Desserts with Barbara Fairchild
Culinary Stage - UA Mall

Writing Comedy for TV: An Interview with Bill Odenkirk
Integrated Learning Center - Room 130

Collaborative Food Writing: A Delicious Blend of Science, Art and Great Taste
Integrated Learning Center - Room 119

12:30 - 1 p.m.
Small lunch break + meandering
I'll probably check out the Twitter wall and head to the E-Reader Experience tent to play with the Nook, Kindle and other gadgets.

1 - 2 p.m.
Be the Moon: Stories of War and Hope
Integrated Learning Center - Room 130

Alternatives:
Colossus: Hoover Dam and the Making of the American Century
Integrated Learning Center - Room 150

It's Okay to Eat Watermelon: Wally "Famous" Amos
UA Mall Tent

Louis Sachar
Teen Authors Lounge

2 - 2:30 p.m.
Meandering + rehydration + snack time

2:30 - 3:30 p.m.
I See Rude People: The Collapse of Civility and What We Want To Do About It with Amy Alkon
UA Bookstore

Alternatives:
From Silly to Serious: Writing Across Genres with Louis Sachar, Candace Fleming, and Grace Lin
Education Building - Kiva Auditorium

Writing Spaces and What They Look Like and How You Can Design Your Own
Integrated Learning Center - Room 119

How to Document Your Culture: 40 Years of Photographing Latinos in the U.S. with José Galvez
Integrated Learning Center - Room 137

3:30 - 4 p.m.
Break time + confer with other reporters + take photos

4 - 5 p.m.
Writing Your Family History Through Family Recipes with Linda Murray Berzok
Integrated Learning Center - Room 135

Alternatives:
The Glamour of Grammar: A Journey Through the Magic and Mystery of Practical English with Roy Peter Clark
Arizona Daily Star Pavilion - UA Mall

The Ties that Bind: Relationships in Fiction
Student Union - Catalina Room

Twisted and Torn: Relationships in Crime Fiction
Modern Languages - Room 350

Eagerly Awaiting the Zompocalypse
Integrated Learning Center - Room 150

I hope to see you there!

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Arizona's government plans to cut $170 million from state universities

My friend and news editor at the Arizona Daily Wildcat goes on Arizona Public Media's "Arizona Week" to talk about the $170 million cuts to the state universities:



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Tuesday, March 8, 2011

My review of A.J. Liebling's "Between Meals"

Between Meals: An Appetite for Paris (Modern Library)
Between Meals: An Appetite for Paris by A.J. Liebling
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Due to a combined misfortune of timing and circumstance, I have not been to the Paris that Liebling describes in "Between Meals." Given that this was Liebling's last book before his death in 1963, I suspect that the Paris contained within this slender book were no more than so many remembered meals by the time this was published. Regardless, Liebling's Paris recalls a time when people savored their food and drink. (Then again, this was also when our traditional notions of men and women dominated and civil rights in America were not at a high point.)

However, as the title implies, the meals were secondary to the people who toiled to create them and the company they provided to those who appreciated good food. The meals, which are sumptuously described, are nothing more than catalysts for Liebling to recall his Paris and its inhabitants.

Liebling's writing exemplifies the New Yorker magazine's style: literary in tone, knowledgeable without sounding too snobbish, rich with the right details, humorous and opinionated without being unseemly. Few writers and journalists nowadays can write like this and not sound pretentious. Even though "Between Meals" represents its time and an era that no longer existed, it continues to serve as a classic food memoir by which other food memoirs should be judged. Well worth reading.

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Sunday, February 27, 2011

It started out well...

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Academy Awards 2011 edition

The winners:
Documentary short subject - "Strangers No More"
Short film, live action - "God of Love"
Short film, animated - "The Lost Thing"
Film editing - "The Social Network"
Visual effects - "Inception"
Sound editing - "Inception"
Sound mixing - "Inception"
Documentary feature - "Inside Job"
Makeup - "The Wolfman"
Costume design - "Alice in Wonderland"
Cinematography - "Inception"
Art direction - "Alice in Wonderland"
Original song - "We Belong Together" by Randy Newman
Original score - "The Social Network" by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross
Animated feature - "Toy Story 3"
Foreign language film - "In a Better World" (Denmark)
Adapted screenplay - "The Social Network"
Original screenplay - "The King's Speech"
Best actress in a supporting role - Melissa Leo for "The Fighter"
Best actor in a supporting role - Christian Bale for "The Fighter"
Best actress in a leading role - Natalie Portman for "Black Swan"
Best actor in a leading role - Colin Firth for "The King's Speech"
Best director - Tom Hooper for "The King's Speech"
Best picture - "The King's Speech"

My picks:
Documentary short subject - "The Warriors of Qiugang"
Short film, live action - N/A
Short film, animated - N/A
Film editing - "Black Swan"
Visual effects - "Inception"
Sound editing - "The Social Network"
Sound mixing - "Inception"
Documentary feature - N/A
Makeup - "The Wolfman"
Costume design - "Alice in Wonderland"
Cinematography - "Inception"
Art direction - "Alice in Wonderland"
Original song - N/A
Original score - "The Social Network" by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross
Animated feature - N/A
Foreign language film - N/A
Adapted screenplay - "True Grit"
Original screenplay - "Inception"
Best actress in a supporting role - Hailee Steinfeld for "True Grit"
Best actor in a supporting role -  John Hawkes for "Winter's Bone"
Best actress in a leading role - Jennifer Lawrence for "Winter's Bone" or Natalie Portman for "Black Swan"
Best actor in a leading role - Colin Firth for "The King's Speech," Jesse Eisenberg for "The Social Network," or Jeff Bridges for "True Grit"
Best director - N/A (Too tough to choose!)
Best picture - N/A (Missed out on four of the nominees: "Toy Story 3," "127 Hours," "The Fighter," and "The Kids Are All Right."

So what have I learned from the Academy Awards this year? One, many of the Best Picture nominees deal with the body in one way or another: "Black Swan," "127 Hours," "The Fighter," "Inception," "Winter's Bone," "The King's Speech." The show, from what I could watch, had a lot of missteps in terms of pacing and entertainment. Now, it's time to try and catch the nominated films I missed, especially "Toy Story 3."

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Wednesday, February 16, 2011

Brief comment on the 53rd Grammy Awards

I saw about the last third, but it was a great last third.
  • Arcade Fire won Best Album of the Year for The Suburbs.
  • Esperanza Spalding beat Justin Bieber for Best New Artist.
All is right in the world of mainstream music — for now.

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My review of 'The 4 A.M. Breakthrough'

4 A.M. Breakthrough: Unconventional Writing Exercises That Transform Your Fiction4 A.M. Breakthrough: Unconventional Writing Exercises That Transform Your Fiction by Brian Kiteley
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Unlike his previous book, "The 3 A.M. Epiphany," this is a collection of writing exercises and prompts to jumpstart the imagination. Many of the exercises require research, which is a nice challenge. Many of the explanations are autobiographical in nature, which often proved to be engaging for me. (Your opinion may vary.) I haven't taken many English or creative writing courses, but I was surprised that Kiteley notes how graduate students often resist or groan about writing prompts. There is a lot of great writing that is produced within defined restraints and conventions, e.g. genre fiction. At some point, I'll have to randomly choose a prompt and write within its borders. For now, this book provides some roundabout insights into how writers approach the blank page and generate strands of fiction that may or may not be used in a future project.

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Friday, February 11, 2011

Valentine's Day in Japan

From the Wall Street Journal blog, Japan Real Time:

"In Japan, the burden falls on the woman to shower the men in her life with chocolates. And in another departure from the Western tradition, it is a gesture that sings a more obligatory note than a lover’s serenade."

(UPDATE: My friends on Facebook pointed me to "White Day," which takes place a month after Valentine's. I'm not surprised there is an answer day. My thanks to Chris and Liz for pointing this out!)

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Monday, February 7, 2011

Photo editing diversion

This comes from my friend Abby via Facebook:

(1) Go to Wikipedia and hit Random Article. The first article you get is the name of your band. (2) Go to quotationspage.com and hit Random Quote. The last four or five words of the very last quote of the page is the title of your album. (3) Go to flickr and click on “explore the last seven days." The third picture, regardless of what it is, is your album art. (4) Use Photoshop or similar (picnik.com is a free online photo editor) to put it all together.

I cheated a little in my creation. Instead of choosing "explore the last seven days," I went with the third picture from The Commons area of Flickr to avoid any issues with copyright. (The Creative Commons area is also a good place to grab a photo, too, as long as you are familiar with Creative Commons licenses.)

Anyway, here's the result:



I did the photo editing with Aviary's Phoenix tool, which is free to use.

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Friday, January 28, 2011

Bo Coker is Making a Record!

With a few days to spare, friends of Bo Coker (which includes me) were able to fully fund his Kickstarter project.

Congratulations Bo! Can't wait to hear the album!

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Thursday, January 27, 2011

Review of "Peepo Choo" by Felipe Smith

Peepo Choo, Volume 1Peepo Choo, Volume 1 by Felipe Smith
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Felipe Smith brings a kinetic feel to his satirical look at American and Japanese subcultures, whether it's comic books or organized crime. Like much of mainstream manga, Smith exaggerates: anatomy, weirdness, violence, sex. But in bringing his art and story to such extremes, he lays the groundwork for finding out the complicated truths and disheartening assumptions about people and subcultures on both sides of the Pacific. As evidenced by the cover, there are many sexually and violently explicit images, but they are similar in tone to pulp fiction (and I don't mean Tarantino's movie, either) or to a grindhouse movie, only better. This is an odd, manic, and exciting introduction.

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Arizona Daily Wildcat's EIC interview on Arizona Illustrated







(Via)

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Friday, January 14, 2011

First episode of 'Portlandia' online

By Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein, the series premieres on IFC on January 22, but it's already showing up on Hulu:






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'The Daily Show' criticizes criticism of memorial at the UA

First, context:

The Daily Show With Jon StewartMon - Thurs 11p / 10c
Veiled Criticism
www.thedailyshow.com
Daily Show Full EpisodesPolitical Humor & Satire Blog</a>The Daily Show on Facebook

(Via)

Unbelievable. I can't believe the pundits would say such plainly ignorant comments. You're questioning the timing of the memorial service? (And this coming from an Obie, sadly.) The prayer offered by a Pasqua Yaqui Indian who is a native Tucsonan, a family doctor and UA faculty member, and who was given special permission from his tribal elders to share something sacred with the world at a memorial service? (This is not the first time prayers have been offered on campus after a tragedy, either.) That it wasn't a better show? That it was too much of a pep rally? (Ever heard of catharsis?)

Talk about grasping at straws and being completely out of touch with Tucson, Arizona, and any culture that isn't your own.

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Thursday, January 13, 2011

Together We Thrive


Together We Thrive, originally uploaded by arizonadailywildcat.

This photo by Ernie Somoza goes with my article here.

President Obama's speech at McKale Center in Tucson

The New York Times has a full transcript here.

The Arizona Daily Wildcat has been covering the attack on Giffords and 19 others well. You can find my modest contributions to date— the first public statement from Jared Loughner's family and a paper chain organized by the UA & ASU with messages to Giffords and those injured or killed — here and here.

What happened.

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